Gallery

There is some debate as to whether Brompton has an undiscovered cellar..



The architect's blueprints on similar properties in the area denote cellars under the stairs.  The deeds of Brompton show no such space, probably owing to the house being perched on a hill yet we may never know for sure (unless we get geo-phys from the Time Team in!) whether or not there is a cellar here.

Fascinating!

The music that is playing is Elgar's 'Rosemary: That's For Remembrance'  which, apart from having been written in 1915 around the time Brompton was first in use, joyfully coincides with the namesake of one-half of the current ownership!  



Elgar took the phrase from Shakespeare's Hamlet (Act 4 Scene 5) in the passage beginning "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance,..." referring to the aromatic herb.

The ancient Greek meaning of Rosemary is literally Remembrance..

 

                                                                                         lest we forget!

From the second floor windows of Brompton you can see some of the North Downs notably the Reigate hill towers.  You can also observe the Royal Alexandra and Albert School in Gatton Park.



RAA is the only state boarding school that takes juniors from as young as 7 where they can remain until age 18.  That's a long time!



Gatton was one of the most notorious of the rotten boroughs by electing 2 MPs between 1450 and 1832, when the constituency was abolished by the Great Reform Act.  Gatton was often held up by the reformers as the epitome of what was wrong with the unreformed system!

 

The North Down's Way alongside the Pilgrim's Way are lovely trails to follow on a summer's day.

 Brompton has changed over the years.  At one stage a white picket fence ran up the front of the property.  



There also used to be 2 trees out front.  One morning a conversation was had in the kitchen about the Laburnum that was laying straight across Crossland Road (fortunately no-one was hurt!)



The Laburnum is a deciduous tree native to the mountains of southern Europe.  They are related to the pea plant and have distinctive yellow trifoliate leaves, somewhat like a clover.  All parts of the plant are poisonous, and can be lethal if consumed in excess..    

                              

 perhaps it's not such a bad thing it went! 

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